From the ears of Introverts: How sound and music can influence your energy

This article first appeared in issue 2 of The Introvert Effect Magazine https://theintroverteffect.com/free-introvert-magazine/

As a sensitive, introverted type of soul – you might have noticed a thing or two about sounds and music. You might be aware of sounds and music that get your attention, what drives you crazy (don’t you dare tap your fingers on a table near me!), what drains you, what gives you a headache, what energises you and what helps you feel a sense of peace. Getting to know and understand your sound and music sensitivities, preferences and stressors is a helpful, practical and fun way to boost your physical and emotional well-being and productivity. You can create your own toolkit of music and strategies to help you thrive in different environments and conditions.

Listening to music can have a profound impact on our bodies and energy. Research has shown that music can affect our heart rate, increase oxygen flow, influence cortisol (stress hormone) levels, motivate for increased physical movement, maximise concentration and promote sleep. The most important thing when you are choosing music to boost wellbeing – make sure you like it. There’s no need to overcomplicate things by worrying about beats per minute for a relaxing song – consider, do I like it? Does it make me feel relaxed? Listen closely, consciously and with intent. Get to know the music. What is more powerful than listening to music? Singing. You don’t have to get up on stage, but even a few minutes in the shower can be an easy way to relax, or ramp up your energy with a more upbeat song.

For those of us that identify as sensitive and introverted, auditory stimulation that we did not choose and do not have control over can feel irritating, distracting, draining and overwhelming. For example, passengers having noisy mobile phone conversations near us on public transport can set our teeth on edge. Working in an open plan office can be distracting – and it’s not always possible or appropriate to tune out with headphones. And if you have young children like me, well…they do say that children are sent to teach us!

If you know you are going to be exposed to an overwhelmingly noisy environment – schedule in time later where you can recover. Visit a garden and listen to the birds, lie down in silence, listen to music of your choice in the bath or aim for an earlier night’s sleep. Sometimes silence is a long way off in my busy day, so I counter this by listening to a favourite song that re-energises me. (Even though it’s more sound, it’s sound that I love and that I choose – somehow it magically re-sets me).

Photo by Eric Nopanen on Unsplash

Photo by Eric Nopanen on Unsplash

Create Your Music + Sound Kit

It’s so easy with Spotify and YouTube to find songs and music – I’d love to invite you to spend some time exploring and creating your own kit.

Here are some prompts – why not go and find a song to fit? I’ve shared some of my favourites.

For focus and clarity: Bach Cello Suite No. 1 – Yo Yo Ma (lots of structure, one instrument, beautiful – this helps me think and feel peaceful – I listen to it before facilitating a coaching session).

For confidence: Consider a song that makes you feel strong, sure and empowered. Think about the lyrics and the energy combined. My favourite is #41 by Dave Matthews Band (“I will go in this way and find my own way out” are lyrics that resonate with me).

For relaxation: Typically music that is slower tempo and doesn’t jump around a lot in the melody is relaxing – however this is personal, so if Metallica relaxes you – then you know what to do. I like Loreena McKennitt’s album Nights from the Ahlambra.

For release of pent up emotion (frustration, anger): Something that matches your energy is a good choice – think faster tempo, louder volume, drums, guitar...I tend to choose songs I can really ‘belt’ out and tend toward songs from the guitar bands of the 90s (showing my vintage here!).

For writing/working: If it has lyrics then I can get more easily distracted. On Spotify, I have a favourite playlist of acoustic guitar unfamiliar songs (if they were known songs, I’d be singing instead of typing). It’s called Acoustic Concentration (the one with 450k followers).

For celebration: What songs makes you feel joyful? Consider what songs evoke beautiful and happy memories from past celebrations you can revive, and lean into those feelings again. My personal pick is “These Days” by Powderfinger.

There are endless ways that music can help serve you in managing your energy as an introvert. Be conscious and intentional of how you listen, where you listen, why you listen and what you choose. We can’t always control the stimulation that comes at our ears in this busy world, but we can always find ways to retreat and to come back to ourselves with music.

© Naomi Morrow, 2017.